Students Contend for Ribbons at the York Fair

Students+Contend+for+Ribbons+at+the+York+Fair

By Grace Burns, Assistant Editor-in-Chief

Seven students have entered work into competitions at this year’s York Fair in hopes of winning prizes.

The fair is a prime place for students to showcase their artistic, sewing, and animal showing skills and talents as there is usually a large turnout of people who attend every year.  Attracting families and members of the community, it has been an extremely meaningful tradition for the people of York for hundreds of years, according to the Official York Fair website.  In fact, the York Fair was America’s first fair, dating all the way back to 1765.  It only lasted two days and was an agricultural market located on the town commons, which is now known as Penn Park.  As years passed, the fair grew both in size and length and caters to current interests.  By 1997, the fair started lasting ten days and becoming a central aspect of York.

Junior Danielle Mentlik has entered eight cattle into the fair this year and hopes for a good turnout with her largest steer.

“I’ve been showing there since I was eight,” said Mentlik. “I’ve also been a part of the 4-H youth club for eight years, and [the York Fair] is one of the bigger and best shows we all attend.”

Through the 4-H club, youth are encouraged to reach out to their community and also learn about agricultural science and healthy living.  More information regarding the organization can be found on the 4-H Youth Club website.

Besides entering livestock, many students have submitted handmade clothing and accessories.  Multiple students have already won awards for their entries.

Sophomore Shannon Walsh won first place for her quilt pillow and is excited for the turnout with her other pieces, which she made last year.

“I entered a quilt pillow, a name pillow, marble design that says ‘hope,’ and a giraffe stuffed animal,” said Walsh. “I got good grades on them, so I thought I might win.”

New to the fair competitions, junior Katie Wilson entered six items ranging from a pillow to a dress.

“I’ve worked on the clothes for a couple of months,” said Wilson. “And Mrs. Sandusky recommended that I enter the fair.”

In the past, more students have submitted, but family and consumer science teacher Martha Sandusky has recognized talent in the students who entered this year and would encourage other students to participate in the competitions in the future.

“It shows the community what our school does,” said Sandusky. “It’s a good reflection on what their abilities are, and it’s fun to see if you can win.”

Attracting families and members of the community, it has been an extremely meaningful tradition for the people of York for hundreds of years, according to the Official York Fair website.  In fact, the York Fair was America’s first fair, dating all the way back to 1765.  It only lasted two days and was an agricultural market located on the town commons, which is now known as Penn Park.  As years passed, the fair grew both in size and length and caters to current interests.  By 1997, the fair started lasting ten days and becoming a central aspect of York.

Visiting the York Fair is a great opportunity to admire the hard work of many students and also connect with the community.