“Captain Marvel” Flies Higher, Further and Faster into Theaters

Anna Feild, Reporter

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“Captain Marvel,” the first solo movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) for a female hero, soared into theatres on March 8.

The movie focuses on Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) and her journey to unlock her muddled past and her full potential, all while involved in a war between the Kree and the Skrulls.

Danvers is a Kree, who are a race of warriors fighting a war against the Skrulls, who are an alien race of shapeshifters.

With the mix of new characters, such as Maria Rambeau (Lashana Lynch) and Skrull leader Talos (Ben Mendelsohn), and the reintroduction of familiar characters, such as Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg), the film does a great job of integrating this new hero into the existing universe.

Photo via @captainmarvel on Twitter
Maria Rambeau (Lashana Lynch) is Carol’s best friend from when they served in the Air Force together. Photo via @captainmarvel on Twitter

The introduction of Captain Marvel helps to tie up lots of remaining loose ends and answers lingering questions from other MCU films – including how Fury lost his eye.

Though it has a slow and slightly confusing start, “Captain Marvel” quickly begins to pick up speed once the conflict is introduced, and Danvers crashlands onto planet C-53 – also known as Earth.

Taking place in the 1990s, the film is full of nostalgia and nods to this era, through the prevalence of certain stores such as Radio Shack and Blockbuster, the fashion (at one point, Danvers steals a “grunge” outfit off of a mannequin) and the soundtrack featuring Nirvana and No Doubt, among many other easter eggs.

The movie also features an unexpected scene stealer – Goose the cat.

Goose steals every scene he’s in, along with the hearts of viewers. Photo via @captainmarvel on Twitter

Fury and Danvers meet Goose while gathering information on Earth, and Fury instantly bonds with the animal, resulting in an unusual but lovable duo.

Throughout “Captain Marvel,” Danvers faces many challenges that many women watching can relate to – she’s told she’s too emotional to fight and she’s not allowed to do what she loves (flying airplanes) because she is a woman, to name a few.

No matter how many times she is knocked down; however, she always gets back up and proves everyone who doubts her wrong.

Full of empowering lines about her power and self-worth, Carol Danvers is truly a role model and positive influence for women everywhere.

Photo via @captainmarvel on Twitter
Brie Larson signs an autograph for a little girl dressed as Captain Marvel at the premier of the movie. Photo via @captainmarvel on Twitter

Currently, “Captain Marvel” has a score of 80% on Rotten Tomatoes, which is impressive considering the issues it has faced before its release.

Rotten Tomatoes had to change its policy to block comments before a movie’s release due to trolls blasting it with negative reviews because they felt it was too political.

“We are disabling the comment function prior to a movie’s release date,” said Rotten Tomatoes on their website. “Unfortunately, we have seen an uptick in non-constructive input, sometimes bordering on trolling, which we believe is a disservice to our general readership.”

Despite these initial setbacks, “Captain Marvel” made $153 million domestically opening weekend and $455 million globally; this film is the seventh-best domestic launch for a MCU title.

This movie is not the last time that audiences will see Captain Marvel – Danvers will return for “Avengers: Engame,” and Thanos should be nervous.

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