The Fall of Puppy Mills

Puppies+from+the+170+Samoyed%27s+rescued.
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The Fall of Puppy Mills

Puppies from the 170 Samoyed's rescued.

Puppies from the 170 Samoyed's rescued.

Puppies from the 170 Samoyed's rescued.

Puppies from the 170 Samoyed's rescued.

Kylee Galante, Reporter

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Recently California passed a law banning the sale of puppy mill pets at pet stores, and every other state should follow suit. 

Pet stores are now required to state what shelter, rescue group or animal control agency they got the dog from, and if they do not do so, they can be fined $500. 

There are so many animals out there that already need a home, and the mass breeding at puppy mills makes it harder for all of them to find homes due to people wanting the purebred puppies.

Not only does this new law make it easier for the pets that already populate the world to find homes, but it also may make it easier to get rid of puppy mills in general.

With this law, it prevents puppy mills from making a profit and can help save more dogs from living such a cruel life.

Puppy mills are horrible places that put dogs through so much suffering.

The people in charge of the puppy mills put them in tiny cages to maximize the space and amount of dogs they can have, breeding them over and over.

This is an example of horrible living conditions in a puppy mill. Photo courtesy of @aliverescue via Instagram

These dogs never know what life is like outside of a cage, they are never groomed and do not receive annual check-ups at the vet, which can lead to sickness, and the puppies being born with hereditary issues from the parents not receiving proper care. 

170 Samoyed’s were recused after a puppy mill was shut down in Iowa. Photo courtesy of @samdersoncooper_samoyed via Instagram

These puppies are also separated from their parents and siblings at an early age, leading to anxiety and stress.

Sometimes these signs will not show up until the puppy is brought home with a person.

Photo from Mowgli_the_sammy

These are puppies from the 170 Samoyeds rescued. Photo courtesy of Mowgli_the_sammy via Instagram

Pennsylvania has the 4th highest number of puppy mills, 9 of them being the worst in the country according to CBS Local News.

In Pennsylvania, it is illegal to sell puppy mill pets, and it is required that pet stores sell pets from animal shelters and rescue organizations.

Puppy mills need to be stopped, and this law should be made in every state.

By making this law, it will make it easier for the dogs who still need a home to get one, put a stop to overpopulation and result in fewer strays.

The “adopt, don’t shop” motto is definitely one to follow because there are so many sweet dogs out there who need a second chance to live a happy healthy life.

Find out more about puppy mills on the ASPCA website.

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